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Houses - Streets - Numerical - 4th-7th

#1773

Date: c. 1910
Source: George Kelly, donor
Photographer:

Information: 431 Fourth Street. New Westminster. House built c.1890. First owner was William H. Falding. Falding may have been a clerk of the Supreme Court. George Gray, the owner of the house in 1929, was a steam roller driver in New Westminster. George Kelly, who is the boy depicted with the bike, is the donor.

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Houses - Streets - Numerical - 8th-12th

#1919

Date: 1910
Source: Esther Paulson, donor
Photographer:

Information: The P. Nelson house at 327-8th Street. This house was built in 1903. Little girl in front of the house is Edna Nelson who is a cousin of Esther Paulson.

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Houses - Streets - Numerical - 8th-12th

#2679

Date: [N.D.] c. 1925
Source: G. Furness, donor
Photographer:

Information: The William Furness home at 340 Tenth Street (St. Andrew's Street). William Furness was the tender for the Lulu Island Bridge and built this home after his retirement in 1912. It is an excellent example of a Craftsman-style bungalow and as of 1991 it was virtually in original condition. The house was built in 1913. Its architect, Edmund J. Boughen, also designed his own home "E-Dee-Nie" at 315 Fourth Avenue. Mr. Boughen's offices in the old Masonic Block at 26 Lorne Street are still in use as offices. William Furness' son Thomas was a city superintendent for many years, starting the job by laying sawdust roads. In September, 1898, Thomas' wife looked out the window and saw downtown New Westminster in flames. She called out, "Tom, Tom the town's on fire," to her husband, who was asleep after a long working day. "Let it burn," was his reply. But he roused himself to protect their house, cow and fruit trees from the burning particles blowing up the hill.

The exterior of the Furness home is fir clapboard, with Swiss braces under the eaves and a spacious porch with wide supports. To give the building an "arts and crafts" look the concrete block foundation was rusticated, except at the corners where they are smoothed to look like quoins in a stone building. Inside, the parlour ceiling is coffered and all the built-in cabinets, the window and door architraves, the mantelpiece and other woodwork are of varnished fir. The stained glass windows have floral and fruit patters. The lighting fixtures are typical examples of the Tiffany art nouveau style.

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Houses - Streets - Numerical - 8th-12th

#707

Date: c. 1970
Source:
Photographer:

Information: 10th Street at 3rd Avenue

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Houses - Streets - Alphabetical - A-B

#419

Date: [N.D.]
Source:
Photographer:

Information: Peter Paulson residence, 423 Ash Street, 1910. In picture: Esther Paulson (born in house 1906) P. Edwin Paulson (born in house 1904). House was the "Woltender House" built in 1883/1884. It was bought by Peter Paulson (wife, Hilda) in 1900.

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