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Floods - 1948

#3083

Date: May - June 1948
Source: *Dan Mott, donor
Photographer: Roy LeBlanc, Croton Studios, New Westminster

Information: This photograph was taken at South Westminster (Surrey side of the Fraser River). Work crews are reinforcing railway dykes against the rising Fraser. After a three-week vigil they won their battle against high water and high tides. This photograph appears in the book "Nature's Fury," R971.133 N219. The flood, which affected many parts of B.C. began on May 24, 1948. The Queensborough dyking effort was first led by "Scotty" McKenzie, and involved many civilian volunteers, some from the surrounding districts. Eventually the army took over direction of operations. Lieut.-Col. F.C.B. Cummins of the Westminster Regiment commanded 300 uniformed men who worked with the civic authorities and civilian volunteers. Cost of the Queensborough operation has been estimated at $26,000. $10,000 went for sandbags. After a three-week vigil, the battle in Queensborough was considered won, after June 10 when the levees held up during a peak tide of 14.4 feet.
*Donor of this photo Dan Mott, is the grandson of W.M. Mott who was Mayor of New Westminster at the time the flood took place. This was one of the official photographs given to the mayor at the time.

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Floods - 1948

#3092

Date: May - June 1948
Source: *Dan Mott, donor
Photographer: Croton Studios, New Westminster

Information: To prevent the Fraser River from flooding in Queensborough, sandbags were filled an placed by the C.P.A. Plant. Although the original photograph said that over 700,000 bags were filled, the book "Nature's Fury," R971.133 N219 said that over 1,000,000 bags were used to strengthen the levees in that area. The flood which affected many parts of B.C. began on May 24, 1948. The Queensborough dyking effort was first led by "Scotty" McKenzie, and involved many civilian volunteers, some from the surrounding districts. Eventually the army took over direction of operations. Lieut.-Col. F.C.B. Cummins of the Westminster Regiment commanded 300 uniformed men who worked with the civic authorities and civilian volunteers. Cost of the Queensborough operation has been estimated at $26,000. $10,000 went for sandbags. After a three-week vigil, the battle in Queensborough was considered won, after June 10 when the levees held up during a peak tide of 14.4 feet.
*Donor of this photo Dan Mott, is the grandson of W.M. Mott who was Mayor of New Westminster at the time the flood took place. This was one of the official photographs given to the mayor at the time.

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Floods - 1948

#3095

Date: May - June 1948
Source: * Dan Mott, donor
Photographer: Croton Studios, New Westminster

Information: This photograph appears on p.11 of the book "Nature's Fury," R971.133 N219 with the following caption: "Families were stranded at Agassiz." The flood, which affected many parts of B.C. began on May 24, 1948. At the time, Agassiz was a little known farming community of 2,000 people, 80 miles from Vancouver.
*Donor of this photo Dan Mott, is the grandson of W.M. Mott who was Mayor of New Westminster at the time the flood took place. This was one of the official photographs given to the mayor at the time.

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Floods - 1948

#3096

Date: May 27, 1948
Source: *Dan Mott, donor
Photographer: Croton Studios, New Westminster

Information: This photograph appears in the daily "British Columbian" on Thursday, May 27, 1948, p.1 and in the weekly "British Columbian" on May 31, 1948, p.36. The photo appears in the weekly with the following caption: "First flood pictures were taken for the British Columbian at Agassiz district Thursday. The Agassiz school, just outside the town was surrounded by four feet of water." The same photograph also appears in the book, "Nature's Fury" R971.133 N219, p.16. The flood, which affected many parts of B.C., began on May 24, 1948. Agassiz was a little known farming community of 2,000 people, 80 miles from Vancouver, at the time of the flood.
*Donor of this photo Dan Mott, is the grandson of W.M. Mott who was Mayor of New Westminster at the time the flood took place. This was one of the official photographs given to the mayor at the time.

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Floods - 1948

#3097

Date: May 28, 1948
Source: *Dan Mott, donor
Photographer: Croton Studios, New Westminster

Information: This photograph appeared in the daily "British Columbian," May 29th, 1948, p.1. It also appeared in the weekly "British Columbian" on May 31, 1948, p.1, with the following caption: "The Fraser river continued its rampage Friday night when Nicomen island was flooded and waters were sent swirling into the waterfront area of Mission. A view of Warren avenue shows the way to the Mission bridge which became too flooded for auto travel late Friday. High riding army trucks pushed essential traffic to and from the bridge approach. The bridge gouge on Saturday afternoon was nudging 24 feet."
*Donor of this photo Dan Mott, is the grandson of W.M. Mott who was Mayor of New Westminster at the time the flood took place. This was one of the official photographs given to the mayor at the time.

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